A year on — Progress update on ‘Out of sight — Who Cares?’ review into restraint, seclusion and segregation

‘Since the release of our original report there has been a real step change in collaboration across the system’

However, there has been some key progress at a system level, to name a few…

  • Independent reviews of everyone who we found in segregation in our initial review have happened. We recommended these take place in our Interim report: Review of restraint, prolonged seclusion and segregation for people with a mental health problem, a learning disability and or autism. A report of these reviews was published by Baroness Hollins in July 2021 and highlighted improvement areas for immediate action which are currently in the process of being implemented, with support from the Department of Health and Social Care.
  • In July 2021, the government published its new ‘National Strategy for autistic children, young people and adults’. The strategy contains the government’s vision for autistic people and their families across six priority areas including tackling health and care inequalities for autistic people, building the right support in the community and supporting people in inpatient care.
  • NHS England is carrying out a review of advocacy for children, young people and adults with a learning disability and autistic people in inpatient settings.
  • In January 2021, the Mental Health Act (MHA) white paper made recommendations to improve the way the MHA is used for people with a learning disability or autistic people.
  • Where we have found poor care for people with a learning disability, autistic people and/or people with mental ill health, we are continuing to do our part to drive down unacceptable care by taking enforcement action.
  • We look at the culture of learning disability and autism services through a focus on observation, inspections at different times during the day and night, and capturing peoples experience of care. Learning is shared for use across health and social care services.
  • We have updated our policy ‘Right support, right care, right culture’ which outlines what we expect to see from providers supporting autistic people and people with a learning disability.
  • We are also piloting communication and support tools for use on inspections including a new quality of life tool to improve how we look at how care is being provided for people with a learning disability and/or autistic people.

Call for action

  • Use of restraint, seclusion and segregation is commonplace in some settings
  • Commissioning the right support and services for people with a learning disability and autistic people is not happening quickly enough
  • People are still being placed in services which are not able to give them the right care
  • There are still too many people in inpatient hospital wards
  • When admitted, some people are spending too long in hospital and discharge can be very slow

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We make sure health and social care services provide people with safe, effective, compassionate, high-quality care and we encourage care services to improve.

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Care Quality Commission

Care Quality Commission

We make sure health and social care services provide people with safe, effective, compassionate, high-quality care and we encourage care services to improve.

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